Ieder jaar kent LECTIO een prijs toe aan een gerenommeerd onderzoeker die gespecialiseerd is in een van de onderzoeksdomeinen waarrond LECTIO is opgebouwd. De LECTIO Chair 2018 wordt bekleed door prof. dr. Jill Kraye (Warburg Institute). Zij is een internationale autoriteit op het vlak van de Europese intellectuele geschiedenis en meer in het bijzonder in het onderzoeksdomein van het humanisme en het filosofische denken in de Renaissance.

Op woensdag 16 mei 2018 (Promotiezaal Universiteitshallen – 17u.) zal prof. Kraye een lezing geven met als titel “What does Renaissance Humanism have to do with Renaissance Philosophy?”. De lezing wordt gevolgd door een receptie.

Op donderdag 17 mei 2018 (Raadzaal HIW 01.16 – 10u.) zit prof. Kraye een doctoraatsseminarie voor rond het thema “The Humanist as Philosopher and the Philosopher as Humanist.” Verschillende doctoraatsstudenten uit Leuven, Freiburg en Montreal geven, vertrekkend vanuit hun eigen onderzoek, presentaties rond ditzelfde thema. Het volledige programma vindt u hier. Kijk voor de abstracts op de website.

Voor beide events wordt u vriendelijk verzocht u z.s.m. aan te melden bij lectio@kuleuven.be. Meer informatie vindt u hier.

Date:                       13 February 2018
Time:                       15.30-17.00hr
Venue:                     Amsterdam,VOC-zaal Bushuis, Kloveniersburgwal 48, 1012 CX Amsterdam

Through an analysis of the writings of the Dutch lawyer, poet, translator, and novelist Johan van Heemskerk (1597-1645), the lecture will challenge the traditional nationalistic, monolingual approach to early modern literature that obscures the complex web of relationships between history and literature, the indigenous and the foreign, and the local and the global. The lecture will explore the interplay between romance, history, politics and law in van Heemskerck’s Inleydinghe tot het ontwerp van een Batavische Arcadia (1637), and argue for the need to adopt a transnational approach to the study of literature that dismantles traditional linguistic and disciplinary boundaries and establishes early modern Netherlandic writing within a European framework for cosmopolitan readers of a new global Empire.

James A. Parente is professor of German, Scandinavian and Dutch literature at the University of Minnesota and Director of the Minnesota Center for German and European Studies. He is a specialist in early modern (1400-1750) German, Dutch, and Nordic literatures and cultures, and early modern Neo-Latin literature. He is the author of Religious Drama and the Humanist Tradition: Christian Theater in Germany and the Netherlands, 1500-1680, and has edited/ co-edited two anthologies of critical work on the early modern Holy Roman Empire, and another on modern Scandinavian literature. He has published widely on early modern German, Dutch and Neo-Latin literature, especially drama; Renaissance humanism; gender and sexuality in the German Empire; the Dutch Golden Age; early modern Danish literature, and Henrik Ibsen. He is currently working on translational literary relations between the German Empire, the Netherlands, and Nordic Europe, and on the historiography of Europe in the early modern period.

See: http://acsga.uva.nl/content/events/lectures/2018/02/james-parente.html?origin=oDJ4slPgS6qIgLy8%2BpvH4A.

Prior to this colloquium prof. Parente will give a masterclass about early modern transnational literary history (11-14.30 hr), open to scholars, PhD-students and (R)MA-students. Click here.

In this masterclass Prof. Parente will speak about Transnational Literary History in a Multilingual Age. After general discussion and a lunch break participants can discuss their own themes with professor Parente. The session after lunch will also be open for participants who have not sent in questions.

Date:                       13 February 2018
Time:                       11-14.30hr
Venue:                     Amsterdam, Het Universiteitstheater, Nieuwe Doelenstraat 16, 1012 CP Amsterdam, room 1.01A
Open to:                  scholars, PhD students, (R)MA students, scholars
Credits:                   1 ECTS (for PhD and RMa students only)
Coordination:         Prof. Lia van Gemert
Registration:           Send an e-mail to goudeneeuw-fgw[at]uva.nl (maximum participants in this event: 25)
Register before:     5 February 2018

Literary history once again appears en vogue. With increasing frequency, there have been “new” histories of French (1989; 2010), German (2005), American (2009), and modern Chinese literature (2017), an “atlas” (atlante) of Italian literature (2010-2012), a spatial literary history of Denmark (2010), a new literary history of Al-Andalus (2000), and three separate encyclopedias of Neo-Latin writing (2013, 2015, 2017). A new paradigm for writing European literary history has also been exemplified by David Wallace (2016). Most notably, the final installment of the 10-volume, 8,000-page history of Dutch literature (GNL)was completed in late 2016. The Master Class will explore this renewed interest in literary history, the ways in which the traditional narratives of literary history have been questioned, discarded, or revised, and the recent challenges to writing literary history in the age of global connectivity. We will question the function of literary history, discuss its continued utility, and explore alternatives for writing history for the early modern period in which national and linguistic boundaries were still in flux. Special attention will be paid to the construction of transnational and multilingual narratives for the Low Countries.

James A. Parente, Jr. (Ph.D., Germanic Languages and Literatures, Yale University) is a Professor of German, Scandinavian and Dutch literature at the University of Minnesota and Director of the Minnesota Center for German and European Studies. He is a specialist in early modern (1400-1750) German, Dutch, and Nordic literatures and cultures, and early modern Neo-Latin literature. He is the author of Religious Drama and the Humanist Tradition: Christian Theater in Germany and the Netherlands, 1500-1680, and has edited/ co-edited two anthologies of critical work on the early modern Holy Roman Empire, and another on modern Scandinavian literature. He has published widely on early modern German, Dutch and Neo-Latin literature, especially drama; Renaissance humanism; gender and sexuality in the German Empire; the Dutch Golden Age; early modern Danish literature, and Henrik Ibsen. He is currently working on translational literary relations between the German Empire, the Netherlands, and Nordic Europe, and on the historiography of Europe in the early modern period.

Co-organizers and related events:

  • co-organizers; ACSGA (Van Gemert)
  • related event: Golden Age Seminar, 13 February 2018 by prof. James Parente, Jr., 15.30-17.00, VOC-zaal Bushuis, Kloveniersburgwal 48, 1012 CX Amsterdam. The title of this lecture is: Border Crossings and the Emergence of Dutch Literature.

Programme:

day planning (incl. coffee and tea, and lunch breaks)

  • 11:00             Room open, coffee and tea
  • 11.15-12:30  Lecture with general discussion
  • 12:30-13:15  Lunch in Museumcafé (Oude Turfmarkt 129): participants take care and pay for their own lunch
  • 13:15-14:00  Discussion on themes that the participants have sent in or bring up during the masterclass

Preparation and proposed readings and assigment:

  1. Participation in first and second part of the masterclass (so before and after lunch)
  2. A clear description of the questions you have for prof. Parente, linked to a clear description of your research theme and the steps you have already taken or would consider to take. The maximum number of questions is 3. Questions must be sent in before 5 February (to e.m.p.vangemert[at]uva.nl and cc to goudeneeuw-fgw[at]uva.nl.
  3. The Golden Age seminar in the afternoon is not obligatory for obtaining the 1 EC credit.

Reading for preparation (pdf’s will be sent after we have received your registration at the registration address):

  • Bloemendal, Jan. “Introduction: Bilingualism, Multilingualism and the Formation of Europe.” In Bilingual Europe: Latin and Vernacular Cultures, Examples of Bilingualism and Multilingualism, c. 1300-1800. Ed. Jan Bloemendal. Leiden: Brill, 2015. Pp. 1-14.
  • Deneire, Tom. “Neo-Latin Literature and the Vernacular.” In A Guide to Neo-Latin Literature. Ed. Victoria Moul. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. Pp. 35-51.
  • Gelderblom, Arie Jan and Anne Marie Musschoot. Ongeziene blikken: Nabeschouwing bij de “Geschiedenis van de Nederlandse literatuur.” Amsterdam: Bert Bakker, 2017. Pp. 7-38.
  • Schenkeveld-van der Dussen, M. A., ed. Nederlandse literatuur, een geschiedenis. Groningen: Nijhoff, 1993. “Woord vooraf,” pp. v-viii.
  • Wallace, David. “Table of Contents” and “General Introduction”, in: Europe: A Literary History, 1348-1418. Vol. 1. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. viii-xiii + [table of contents: xxvii-xlii].

After general discussion and a lunch break participants can discuss their own themes with professor Parente.

Please sent your questions by 5 February to Prof. Lia van Gemert e.m.p.vangemert[at]uva.nl and cc to goudeneeuw-fgw[at]uva.nl.

See also: http://acsga.uva.nl/content/events/events/2018/02/masterclass-prof.-james-a.-parente.html.

To commemorate the 300th anniversary of Relandus’ death, the Descartes Centre, Utrecht University, and the Vossius Centre, University of Amsterdam organize a colloquium on the work and influence of Adrianus Reland (1676-1718) on Monday, February 5, 2018. Part of the programme is an exhibition of his manuscripts in the University Library.

On February 5, 1718, Adrianus Relandus, professor of Oriental Languages at the faculty of Philosophy, University of Utrecht, died at young age of smallpox. His lifespan concurs with what Paul Hazard has labelled as La Crise de la Conscience européenne.Relandus (1676-1718) was born in the same year Gisbertus Voetius, professor theology in Utrecht and opponent of the new philosophy of Rene Descartes, died.

After being educated at the Atheneum Illustre in Amsterdam and the universities of Utrecht and Leiden, Relandus was appointed in the ‘Philosophische faculteit’, Faculty of Philosophy in Utrecht in 1700 to teach Oriental languages.

In 1705, he published De Religione Mohammedica in which he advocated a more objective account of this religion. His De Religione Mohammedica was translated into different languages, incl. English and French. Besides, Relandus was an important figure in the geografica sacra. In 1714, he published Palaestina ex monumentis veteribus illustrata.

Relandus never left his home country. As Edward Gibbon wrote: […] ‘Reland, a judicious student, had travelled over the East in his closet at Utrecht’. Relandus was a passionate collector of material about languages in the colonies, i.e. the Netherlands Indies. He was in contact with travellers and collectors, e.g. the Dutch minister Francois Valentijn, Nicolaes Witsen, mayor of Amsterdam, cartographer, diplomate, and Gisbertus Cuper, mayor of Deventer.

The colloquium will take place at Utrecht University and is co-organized by the Descartes Centre for the History and Philosophy of Science, Utrecht University, and the Vossius Centre of the University of Amsterdam. There will be no conference fee.

See also: https://www.uu.nl/en/events/colloquium-on-professor-oriental-languages-adrianus-relandus-1676-1718.

Contact: Henk van Rinsum, PhD, Utrecht University, h.j.vanrinsum@uu.nl.

29 September 2017
09:30 – 17:45 hrs.
University Library, Witte Singel 26-27, Leiden, Vossiuszaal

Effects of the rise of reason of state in political thought on history

It is well known that historical writings and historical information played a crucial role in the development of ideas on reason of state and ‘modern’ political thought (including natural law). The reverse relation, i.e. the effects of the rise of reason of state in political thought on the methods, questions and approaches in history has received far less attention. The purpose of this meeting is an exchange of ideas about this side of the relationship between researchers in the broad field of intellectual history (coming from disciplines such as history, literature, law and philosophy) working on reason of state in the 16th -18th century in various regions in Europe.

Possible specific topics for papers include the changes in historiography as a result of changing ideas on ethics and historical causality and/or the nature of human society; effects of secularisation, and of a sharper distinction between secular and ecclesiastical (or confessional) politics; of the rise of economic thought and the emergence of ‘social sciences’ (such as in the Strasbourg school, which has deep roots in late humanism); connections between growing doubts and controversies regarding the relevance of the Classics in the contemporary world (Querelle des Anciens et Modernes); and questions as to the different effects of reason of state-thought between Catholic and Protestant regions in Europe.

Registration

There is no entrence fee for this symposium. However, we would like you to register on monday september 25 at the latest. You can register by sending an email to Lisa Kattenberg: L.F.Kattenberg@uva.nl with subject Registration symposium. Please also include the following information:

  • Your name (first and last name)
  • If you would like to have lunch. We ask a contribution of 5 euros for lunch, which you can pay on site.
  • If you would like to join for diner. Diner will be at your own expense.

Program

9:30 – 9:45  Opening

9:45 – 11:30  Session 1: Historiography and reason of state: remarks on theory  (Chair: Lisa Kattenberg)
Jan Waszink (Leiden University): Causality and secularisation; the difficult beginnings of a new historiography
Jacques Bos (University of Amsterdam): Reason of state and the circumstances of political action: from exemplarity to historicity

10:45  Short coffee & tea break

Jan Rotmans (University of Amsterdam): ‘Man as he is, not as he ought to be’. The predictability of history and the anti-utopian image of human nature in late Dutch Enlightenment thought
Discussion

11:30 – 11:45 Coffee & tea break

11:45 – 12:45  Session 2: History and reason of state in various European contexts (Chair: tba)
Sarah Mortimer (Christ Church, University of Oxford): History, Reason of State, and the succession crises of the 1590s
Marisol García Gonzalez (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia): Della conservazione della pace dell’Italia. Reason of State and historiography of the Early Modern Milan
Discussion

12:45 – 13:45  Lunch 

13:45 – 14:45  Session 3: Religion, reason of state and the Dutch Revolt (Chair: Jan Waszink)
Alberto Clerici (Università degli Studi “Niccolò Cusano”): Morality, politics and religion in Guido Bentivoglio’s account of the Twelve Years’ Truce (1609)
Lisa Kattenberg (University of Amsterdam): Conscience, experience and reason of state: Spanish debates about peace or truce in the Low Countries
Discussion

14:45 – 15:15  Coffee & tea break

15:15 – 16:15  Session 4: History and reason of state in early Enlightenment thought (Chair: tba)
Arthur Weststeijn (Utrecht University) Classical Colonisation in a Commercial World: Colonial Concepts and Practices between Carlo Sigonio and the Encyclopédie
Marianne Klerk (St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford): Reason of State and Interest in the Dutch Republic: the legacy of Duc de Rohan
Discussion

16:15 – 16:45  General discussion and closing remarks 

16:45 – 17:15  Publication Launch:  Electronic critical edition of Hugo Grotius, De Iure Praedae Commentarius/ The Law of Prize and Booty,   ed. J. Waszink e.a.

17:15  Drinks

20:00  Dinner (location tba)

On 5 and 6 October the seminar ‘Meeting Spinoza: Books, Letters, Networks, Personal Encounters’ will be organised in Utrecht. The organising committee consists of Dr Albert Gootjes, Prof. Piet Steenbakkers and Dr Jeroen van de Ven (all from the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies), who finished the NWO research project Spinoza’s Web this summer.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

  • Raphaële Andrault (CNRS, IHRIM, ENS-Lyon)
  • Mogens Laerke (CNRS, IHRIM, ENS-Lyon)
  • Steven Nadler (Wisconsin-Madison)
  • Antonella Del Prete (Tuscia University)

SPINOZA’S WEB

The Spinoza’s Web-project examines the life and work of the Dutch philosopher Benedict de Spinoza (1632-1677), as well as the networks in which he participated. In the reception and assessment of his thought, scholars have always seen an indissoluble connection between his writings, character and reputation, and the course of his life. Every era thus forms its own impression of Spinoza, and this image plays an important role—more than it does with other philosophers—in the way his thought is understood. This project seeks to develop tools for documenting Spinoza’s life, writings, and work as completely as possible, and will trace out the impact of his philosophy by mapping out the context in which his thought evolved. The project revolves around four research axes, each of which will produce its own output.

For more details and the programme, see programme_seminar_meeting_spinoza. Due to the limited seating capacity please register by email (meetingspinoza@gmail.com) on or before October 1.

For more information about the project, see The Spinoza Web.

38ste Erasmus Birthday Lecture door Peter Mack (Warwick): ‘Paraphrase, Paradox and Amplification in Agricola and Erasmus’

The 38th Erasmus Birthday Lecture lecture will be concerned with Erasmus’s Paraphrases on the New Testament (1517-24), especially the paraphrases on Romans and Mark. It will consider the ways in which the Paraphrases and their paratexts make use of rhetorical techniques described in De copia (1512) and De ratione studii (1511). It will discuss the ways in which Erasmus reads the Bible texts and makes them available to his imagined audience. It will compare the Paraphrases with Rudolph Agricola’s Oration on Christ’s Nativity (1484) and Philipp Melanchthon’s Loci Communes (1521). The lecture was conceived as a tribute to Fokke Akkermann (1930-2017), teacher of Latin in Groningen, pioneering Agricola scholar, editor and translator of Spinoza, and long-term collaborator of the Erasmus edition.

Peter Mack is Professor of English and Comparative Literature aan de Universiteit van Warwick en voormalig directeur van het Warburg Institute in Londen. Professor Mack is een autoriteit in de geschiedenis van de retorica in de renaissance met een brede expertise op het gebied van de middeleeuwse en vroegmoderne ideeëngeschiedenis en literatuurgeschiedenis. Hij publiceerde ondermeer: Renaissance Argument: Valla and Agricola in the Traditions of Rhetoric and Dialectic (1993), Elisabethan Rhetoric (2002), Reading and Rhetoric in Montaigne and Shakespeare (2010), A History of Renaissance Rhetoric 1380-1629 (2011) and Rhetoric’s Questions, Reading and Interpretation (2017).

Datum: 17 November 2017,
Tijd: 16:15-17:15, gevolgd door borrel.
Plaats: VOC-zaal, Oost-Indisch Huis, Kloveniersburgwal 48, 1012 CX Amsterdam
Toegang is gratis, maar graag aanmelden via https://www.knaw.nl/en/news/calendar/38th-erasmus-birthday-lecture-by-peter-mack-2017.

Voorafgaand aan de lezing geeft Peter Mack een masterclass voor gevorderde studenten en promovendi:

 

Masterclass door Peter Mack: ‘Rhetoric as a Guide to Interpretation’

This class will examine the possibility of using the doctrines of rhetoric not for generating new texts but for analysing existing texts and images. Rhetoric invites us to think about the relationship between speaker, audience and subject-matter and provides a range of techniques for finding ideas and words suitable for persuading that audience. The class will  consider the possible hermeneutic applications of a range of rhetorical teachings and will discuss the interpretation of a renaissance poem, a scene from Hamlet, passages from Salman Rushdie’s  The Moor’s Last Sigh, and paintings by Rembrandt (Bathsheba, 1654, Louvre) and Cézanne (Mont St Victoire, 1904-6, Zurich) in this light.

The teacher will provide all participants with around 50 pages of material to read in preparation for the class.

For more information and to apply (ultimately by 3 November), see https://www.knaw.nl/en/news/calendar/peter-mack-rhetoric-as-a-guide-to-interpretation.

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